FAQs

Click each heading to read full response

GENERAL DENTISTRY

6 monthly checkups are recommended in order to maintain good oral hygiene and detect and treat problems as they arise to prevent minor problems from becoming larger ones. 

The quicker a problem is detected and treated, the more successful the treatment will be and the less likely the problem will require more invasive and more expensive treatment.  An oral examination will also help detect other problems such as sleep disorders and bruxism (excessive clenching or grinding).


COSMETIC TREATMENT

These days there are a range of options to help your teeth look great.  There is little doubt that enhancing your smile can improve a person's self-confidence and the results of cosmetic dentistry can be remarkable with the right treatment. 

Stained teeth, dark teeth, chipped teeth, crooked teeth, and even teeth that are missing altogether, can be repaired or replaced.  If this is something you have been thinking about, the best thing to do is to arrange a cosmetic consultation to assess the most suitable treatment for you. Following the assessment, a treatment plan will be provided to you outlining the most suitable treatment for your needs.


CAVITIES

When a cavity is detected, it is crucial that this is treated as soon as possible even if it isn't bothering you.  If left untreated, over time, this cavity is likely to become larger and deeper requiring a larger filling, Root Canal Treatment, a crown or tooth extraction.  In many cases, this type of treatment can be avoided.

NEW PATIENTS

If you haven't been to the dentist in a while, don't be afraid or embarrassed to start now.  Many people have avoided dental treatment due to past bad experiences or fear.  Be assured that we will treat you with the highest care and respect and ensure your visit is as pleasant as possible to get your dental care back on track.

TOOTHACHES

If you have a toothache, get it seen to as soon as possible.  Sometimes pain subsides but generally will reappear, quite often on weekends!

WHICH TOOTHBRUSH?

he best toothbrush is one with a small head and soft bristles.  A good electric toothbrush which pulsates and oscillates is also very good, particularly for people who find proper brushing techniques difficult to master.

PAYMENT OPTIONS

Payment is required on the day of treatment.  We accept cash and all major credit cards including MasterCard, Visa and American Express.  We also have HICAPS, which means that if you have private health insurance incorporating dental cover, we can process a direct claim with most health insurance cards and you can simply pay the gap.

PRIVATE HEALTH INSURANCE

If you have private insurance cover incorporating dental, you are able to see any registered dentist.  Our surgery chooses not to be affiliated with any private health insurance agencies as recommended by the Australian Dental Association.  We believe that to do so may compromise the level of treatment we can offer.  Our fees have been set based on the quality of the treatment we provide, the equipment and material we use and the experience of the laboratories we utilise.  We refuse to compromise on the quality of the treatment and always aim to deliver the best possible treatment and care to our patients at the best possible cost.

SMOKING

Most people are becoming aware that smoking poses a problem to general health.  It contributes to heart disease, stroke, and to a third of all cancer deaths, to name just a few conditions.  In 1992 it was estimated that almost five thousand deaths in Victoria resulted from smoking.

What is less well known is the effect it has in the mouth.

The main damage is to the gums and mucosa, or lining of the mouth. Smokers develop more oral cancers than non-smokers (about five times more) and invariably suffer some degree of gum, or periodontal, disease.

Other than staining, smoking does not affect the teeth.  However, it also has a profound effect on the saliva, promoting the formation of the thicker 'mucous' form of saliva at the expense of the thinner watery 'serous' saliva.  There is a reduction in the acid-buffering capacity of their saliva.

This effect of nicotine explains why some heavy smokers get decay even if they are brushing well.